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Health Literacy



Join us to learn about public health literacy and the role of health care providers in providing health information and services.
**Instructions to access the course will be provided after you register.**
 

Health Literacy: Why Does It Matter?

Did you know that health literacy level is a stronger predictor of a person's health than age, income, employment status, education level, or race? Did you know that almost half of Americans have poor health literacy? Find out how to recognize this problem and break down barriers to increase health literacy in your patients and audiences.

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this recorded, participants will be able to:

  • define health literacy;
  • identify people and/or populations at risk for low health literacy;
  • describe several consequences of low health literacy; and
  • list several strategies for employing plain language.

Health Literacy: The Teach-back Method

Learn the Teach-back Method to assess what your patients know about their own health and discuss your shared plans to improve it. Engaging content will help participants gain a deeper understanding of this fundamental predictor of health status and improve client and clinical services.

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this recorded webinar, participants will be able to:

  • describe the importance of plain language communication;
  • list several avoidable barriers to effective communication; and
  • employ the “Teach-back” method to assess understanding.
     

Using Plain Language to Improve Health Literacy

What are the challenges of wring health and medical content for a lay audience? Join us to learn the fundamentals of health literacy and how to apply best practices for plain language written communication.

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this recorded webinar, participants will be able to:

  • describe the importance of plain language communication;
  • list several avoidable barriers to effective communication; and
  • plan several strategies to increase effective written communications, including with vulnerable communities. 

Target Audience
This presentation is appropriate for all public health practitioners. 

Instructor
Elizabeth Felter, DrPH, MCHES joined the faculty of the University of Pittsburgh School of Public Health Department of Behavioral and Community Health Sciences as an assistant professor in 2010. She has been a Master Certified Health Education Specialist since 2011 and leads the department's health communication-health risk communication curriculum. Felter's research and practice-based work is focused mainly in the area of health education/communications and evaluation, including supporting health departments, health clinics, and non-profits with their COVID-19 response. 

Technology Requirements
This video is presented through the Vimeo Internet-based platform. A computer with high-speed internet connection and the ability to download and run this platform is required. 

For more information about this course or for assistance with registration, contact marphtc@pitt.edu.

If you require an accommodation to participate in this training opportunity, contact marphtc@pitt.edu. 

Creation Date
This training was recorded in October 2021. 

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Introduction to Effective Writing for Public Health Professionals: Email Etiquette and Related Best Practices

Man writing at desk

This recorded webinar introduces participants to strategies and techniques that enable them to write with confidence and know-how. Participants will discover how to express personality and style in their writing, tap into their natural creativity, and present messages in ways that will achieve positive results in public health. The recorded webinar will also address techniques for tailoring writing to meet readers' needs, applying effective email etiquette, and writing precisely to avoid dangerous misunderstandings or mixed messages. 


**Instructions to access the recording will be provided after you register.**
 

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this recorded webinar, participants will be able to:

  • define and apply ‘user-centered’ design for effective professional writing;
  • define the elements of ‘audience analysis’ and its practical relevance to professional written communication;
  • identify strategies to overcome potential ‘writer’s block;’
  • describe effective strategies for proofreading your writing;
  • describe the structure and relevance of briefing memos for effective workplace communication; and
  • describe and apply the elements for professional email etiquette. 

Target Audience
This recorded webinar is appropriate for public health and clinical practitioners with varying professional experiences and diverse educational backgrounds. 

Instructor
Daniel Barnett, MD, MPH is an Associate Professor in the Department of Environmental Health & Engineering at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health (JHSPH), where he has a joint appointment in the Department of Health Policy and Management. He received his MD from The Ohio State University College of Medicine, his MPH and general preventive medicine training from JHSPH, and his BA in English from Yale University. He teaches on writing for public health in connection with his faculty role at JHSPH, and as a trainer for MAR-PHTC. Prior to his academic career, Barnett worked at Baltimore City Health Department's Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response. 

Technology Requirements
This recorded webinar is presented through the Vimeo Internet-based platform. A computer with high-speed internet connection and the ability to download and run this platform is required.
Creation Date

This training was created 11/16/20.
For more information about this course or for assistance with registration, contact marphtc@pitt.edu.

If you require an accommodation to participate in this training contact marphtc@pitt.edu.

JHU


Motivational Interviewing: Eliciting Lasting Behavior Change

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Motivational Interviewing is a particular kind of conversation about behavior change. Rather than advising and convincing a person to change, Motivational Interviewing is a style of communicating that evokes a person’s intrinsic motivation to change, attempts to resolve ambivalence, and minimizes discord in a helping relationship.
In this introductory workshop we dispel myths about the behavior change process, present the evidence base for Motivational Interviewing, and discuss the possible applications of Motivational Interviewing in your own work.
**Instructions to access the recording will be provided after you register.**
Learning Objectives:

At the conclusion of this course, participants will be able to:

  • describe theories of behavior change;
  • explain evidence base for Motivational Interviewing;
  • list the components of Motivational Interviewing, including the Spirit of MI and the skills; and
  • define the concept of “Change Talk” as it relates to their own professions

Risk, Crisis, and Emergency Communication

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This series was developed by the Center for Public Health Readiness and Communication within the Drexel University Dornsife School of Public Health with funding from the PA Department of Health
The Risk, Crisis, and Emergency Communication Video Training Series covers eight topics related to risk and crisis communication during public health emergencies:

  • Communication Skills for Public Information Officers
  • Crisis Communications ‘Top 10’ Planning Checklist
  • How to Produce a Message Map
  • How to Write a Press Release for a Public Health Crisis or Emergency
  • Joint Information Centers for Public Health Crises and Emergencies
  • Nonverbal Communication
  • Using Social Media in Disasters
  • Working with the Media     

The videos feature Dr. Vincent Covello, a leading expert in the field of risk communication, and Tom Hipper, the Program Manager at the Center for Public Health Readiness and Communication. Each video runs approximately 10-30 minutes and covers an important topic related to communicating effectively during emergencies. There is no recommended sequence; each video provides a stand-alone lesson on a risk communication topic. Accompanying each lesson are ‘related resources’ that supplement the content covered in the videos.
**Instructions to access the recording will be provided after you register.
**

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this video series, participants will be able to:

  • employ the skills learned to meet the crisis and emergency risk communication aspects of hazards that pose a health threat to the public; and
  • develop and disseminate message content in crises and emergencies using press releases, message maps, and social media.

Target Audience
This presentation is appropriate for individuals in public health and health care settings who are responsible for crisis communication and public information.
Instructor

Vincent Covello, PhD,
is the founder and Director of the Center for Risk Communication in New York City. He is an internationally recognized trainer, researcher, consultant, and expert in emergency, crisis, and risk communication. Covello serves as a consultant for the CDC and the World Health Organization, and has authored over 150 scientific articles and books on risk and crisis communication.
Tom Hipper, MSPH, MA,
is the Program Manager of the Center for Public Health Readiness and Communication at the Drexel University Dornsife School of Public Health. He is also an Adjunct Professor at Drexel University, where he teaches a course in crisis and risk communication. Hipper has presented on the use of new media in disasters at multiple national conferences, has been trained in Crisis and Emergency Risk Communication, and has published research in Health Security, Health Promotion Practice, Health Communication, and the Journal of Public Health Management and Practice.
This project was supported by the Cooperative Agreement number U90TP000545-03, National Bioterrorism Hospital Preparedness Program and Public Health Emergency Preparedness Program, funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), through a grant from the Pennsylvania Department of Health. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the CDC or the Department of Health.
For more information, contact Tom Hipper at tjh87@drexel.edu.

Using Plain Language to Improve Health Literacy

woman looking at medicine

iStock

This asynchronous training introduces the user to the importance of using plain language in written communication as a tool for improving understanding, health behaviors, and health outcomes. Users will be introduced to the challenges of low health literacy in the United States and practice employing plain language techniques to improve their communication with a variety of audiences.

**Instructions to access the course will be provided after you register.**

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this course, participants will be able to:

  • describe the importance of plain language communication;
  • list several avoidable barriers to effective written communication; and
  • plan several strategies to increase effective written communications, including with vulnerable communities.

Target Audience
This presentation is appropriate for social workers; community health workers; public health and clinical practitioners; and others in a variety of settings including home visiting programs, WIC programs, and primary care settings.

Continuing Education Credit
Continuing Education credit for certified public health professionals (CPH-CE, 1 hour) is available.

Instructor

Elizabeth Felter,
DrPH, MCHES, joined the faculty of the University of Pittsburgh School of Public Health Department of Behavioral and Community Health Sciences as an assistant professor in 2010. She has been a Master Certified Health Education Specialist since 2011 and leads the department's health communication/health risk communication curriculum. Felter's research and practice-based work is focused mainly in the area of health education/ communications and evaluation, including supporting health departments, health clinics, and non-profits with their COVID-19 response.

Technology Requirements

A computer with high-speed internet connection is required to view this course.

Creation Date

This course was created in June 2022.

For more information about this course or for assistance with registration, contact marphtc@pitt.edu.