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8/18/20 Pandemic Policies and Practices: A Conversation about the Ethical Challenges of COVID-19 in Rural Areas

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We are pleased to present this installment of Pandemic Policies and Practices, a distance-accessible series that will host discussions of relevant and thought-provoking ethical issues surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic. This session examines the ethical concerns COVID-19 has presented in rural areas, smaller cities and towns, and areas where patients travel some distance to receive care. The pace of COVID-19 spread has been different in these areas, compared to early hot spots, and health care institutions and providers have faced different challenges compared to their metropolitan area counterparts. Wheeling, West Virginia, for example, has treated many patients from Ohio. Moreover, West Virginia developed a set of crisis care standards for allocation of scarce medical resources like ventilators and Remdesivir that differ from those discussed by previous series speakers. In conversation with Lisa Parker, PhD, Director of the University of Pittsburgh Center for Bioethics and Health Law, Valerie Satkoske, PhD, Director of Ethics at Wheeling Hospital will discuss some of these differences and how challenges facing rural areas may be addressed. 

Date and Time
Tuesday, August 18, 2020
11 a.m.–noon Eastern 

Location
Online. Information to access the webinars will be sent upon registration. 

Target Audience
This presentation is appropriate for public health and clinical professionals, attorneys, researchers, students, and others interested in learning more about pandemic preparedness. 

Facilitator
Lisa S. Parker, PhD is Dickie, McCamey, and Chilcote Professor of Bioethics and Director of the Center for Bioethics & Health Law at the University of Pittsburgh. She collaborates with investigators across the University, as well as national and international colleagues, on both empirical studies and theoretical and policy analyses of bioethical issues. Parker has served on panels and working groups for the NHGRI and has consulted on projects of the NIMH, NIDA, and NICHD. At the state level, she has consulted on newborn screening (Pennsylvania) and stem cell research (Maryland). For the University of Pittsburgh, she provides ethics consultation to the Institute for Precision Medicine and Office of Research through the Research, Ethics and Society Initiative, which she directs. Parker earned her PhD in Philosophy at the University of Pittsburgh.

Instructor
Valerie Satkoske, PhD is the Associate Director of the Center for Health Ethics & Law at West Virginia University where she teaches in the School of Medicine. She has also taught courses in bioethics, responsible conduct of research, and ethics and aging at the University of Pittsburgh. Satkoske currently serves as a consultant at the West Virginia Rural Emergency Trauma Institute, through which she has presented numerous lectures on topics ranging from physician’s orders regarding life-sustaining treatment in rural settings to non-opioid advance directives, to cultural competence and ethics consultation. She has authored publications addressing ethical issues in the context of disasters, trauma nursing, prehospital care, plastic surgery, and public health. Satkoske examines a wide range of issues, especially as they relate to rural healthcare. She serves as the Director of Ethics at Wheeling Hospital, in Wheeling, WV, and as the Director of the University of Pittsburgh’s Consortium Ethics Program that provides ethics education to representatives from healthcare institutions across the Western Pennsylvania region. 

Technology Requirements
This interactive webinar is presented through the Go to Meeting Internet-based platform. A computer with high-speed internet connection and the ability to download and run this platform is required. Connection information will be provided following registration. Basic functionality, including the use of a feature to type in questions, will be reviewed during the webinar. 

We suggest using a headset or webcam with microphone to best engage with the presenter throughout the webinars. Be sure to connect your speaking device to your computer before you enter the virtual webinar room. Trying to connect your speaking device after you enter the room may cause Go to Meeting to not recognize the device and render it unusable. 

For more information about this course or assistance with registration, contact us at marphtc@pitt.edu.

If you require an accommodation to participate in this event, please contact marphtc@pitt.edu by August 11, 2020 at 1 p.m. EST.

9/28/20 Project Management for Public Health Professionals – Dover, DE

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Looking for information to tackle your project challenges? Explore project management principles and approaches—all available to help you make meaningful contributions to the projects you lead or work on. Learn how to match tools to a project based on the profiles of team members and the tasks required by the project. This workshop will cover project management practices, tools, teams, and much more! 

Learning Objectives
In this workshop, you will learn:

  • different approaches to project management and the utility of each approach
  • how to analyze project needs and determine the appropriate project management tool
  • about project management tools used to complete specific tasks 

Date and Time
Monday, September 28, 2020
9 a.m.–3 p.m.
 

Location
Division of Public Health Training Center
Edgehill Shopping Center
43 South DuPont Highway
Dover, DE 19901

Target Audience
This presentation is appropriate for managers in governmental public health agencies, including current mid-level managers, newly appointed managers, and emerging managers. 

Continuing Education Credit
Continuing Education credits for certified public health professionals (CPH-CE, 5 hours) are available. To receive credit, participants must attend sessions from beginning to end and complete an evaluation; no partial credit will be given. 

Instructor
Daniel Barnett, MD, MPH is an Associate Professor in the Department of Environmental Health and Engineering at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, where he has a joint appointment in the Department of Health Policy and Management. Barnett previously served in the Baltimore City Health Department's Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response, where he was responsible for project and priority-related management of bio-preparedness exercise design, evaluation, and related training activities. At Johns Hopkins, Barnett has for several years applied and expanded upon these foundational experiences in his academic and public health practice roles, including delivery of trainings for the public health workforce on project management and on managing multiple priorities and projects, to optimize programmatic effectiveness and efficiency in public health agencies. 

For more information about this course, contact Dan Barnett at dbarnet4@jhu.edu. For assistance with registration, contact marphtc@pitt.edu.

If you require an accommodation to participate in this event, please contact marphtc@pitt.edu by September 21, 2020 at 1 p.m. EST.


10/12/20 Continuous Quality Improvement for Public Health, Dover, DE

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Continuous quality improvement (CQI) is a management process that consists of continuous, systematic actions that lead to measurable improvement in services and outcomes. The process encourages practitioners to start with the questions, “How are we doing?” and “How can we do it better?” The goal is to create an ongoing cycle of collecting data and using it to make decisions that gradually improve program operations. 

This workshop introduces key concepts, strategies, and techniques an agency can use to design an effective approach to CQI implementation. Participants will learn how to plan their own quality improvement projects using proven tools like swim lane mapping, SWOT-PESTLE analysis, and fishbone diagramming. They will also learn how to apply the Plan-Do-Study-Act Cycle to enhance agency-wide efficiency and effectiveness in operations. 

For optimal benefit, participants are encouraged to attend with their quality improvement teams, as substantial time is allotted to the application of material. Optional technical assistance sessions to support CQI implementation may be arranged with the trainer after the workshop. 

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • utilize two methods for monitoring and analyzing performance measures
  • describe three characteristics of a CQI plan
  • apply the Plan-Do-Study-Act Cycle for program improvement 

Date and Time
Monday, October 12, 2020
9 a.m.–3 p.m. 

Location
Division of Public Health Training Center
Edgehill Shopping Center
43 South DuPont Highway
Dover, DE 19901

Target Audience
This presentation is appropriate for public health practitioners with varying professional experiences and diverse educational backgrounds. This workshop is useful for practitioners, teams, and organizations who are interested in improving their performance, efficiency, and effectiveness. 

Continuing Education Credit
Continuing Education credits for certified public health professionals (CPH-CE, 5 hours) are available. To receive credit, participants must attend sessions from beginning to end and complete an evaluation; no partial credit will be given. 

Instructor
Daniel Barnett, MD, MPH is an Associate Professor in the Department of Environmental Health & Engineering at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, where he has a joint appointment in the Department of Health Policy and Management. Barnett's long-standing practice-based and research experiences in public health have included a strong applied emphasis on quality improvement for public health agencies and their stakeholders in the face of evolving challenges to population health. 

For more information about this course, contact Dan Barnett at dbarnet4@jhu.edu. For assistance with registration, contact marphtc@pitt.edu.

If you require an accommodation to participate in this event, please contact marphtc@pitt.edu by October 5, 2020 at 1 p.m. EST.


10/16/20 Job Hunting Ahead! Opportunities in Governmental Public Health

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Interested in exploring mitigation strategies for COVID-19? Want to create policies to help refugees integrate into the community? Aspire to advance health outcomes of underserved populations? Join us for an interactive discussion about this important employment path. Learn about governmental public health from panelists working in public health careers at the local, state, and federal levels who will describe their organization’s mission, how their jobs impact target populations, and their personal journeys into governmental public health. 

Date and Time
Friday, October 16, 2020
1:00–2:15 p.m. Eastern 

Location
Online. Information to access the course will be sent upon registration. 

Target Audience
This presentation is appropriate for students, site supervisors, faculty, and HRSA Public Health Training Center personnel. 

Moderator
Elizabeth Van Nostrand, Director and Principal Investigator, Mid-Atlantic Regional Public Health Training Center

Panelists
Patricia Evans, Chief Learning Officer, DC Health Office of the Director
Deb Koester, Executive Director, West Virginia Local Health Inc.
Megan Lincoln, Public Health Analyst and Project Officer, Health Resources and Services Administration Bureau of Health Workforce
Lauren Orkis, Viral Hepatitis Prevention Coordinator, Pennsylvania Department of Health
Dave Walton, Chief of Office of Performance Management, Delaware Department of Health and Social Services Division of Public Health 

Technology Requirements
This interactive webinar series is presented through the Go to Meeting Internet-based platform. A computer with high-speed internet connection and the ability to download and run this platform is required. Connection information will be provided following registration. Basic functionality, including the use of a feature to type in questions, will be reviewed during the webinar. 

We suggest using a headset or webcam with microphone to best engage with the presenter throughout the webinars. Be sure to connect your speaking device to your computer before you enter the virtual webinar room. Trying to connect your speaking device after you enter the room may cause Go to Meeting to not recognize the device and render it unusable.

For more information about this course or assistance with registration, contact marphtc@pitt.edu.

If you require an accommodation to participate in this event, please contact marphtc@pitt.edu by October 8, 2020 at 1 p.m. EST.